Posted by: Josh Lehner | February 11, 2015

Graph of the Week: Alcohol Cluster

Still working on the start-up brewery report, which will hopefully be out in about a month. For now, here’s a quick update on the alcohol cluster. This is our office’s working definition of the cluster, based on detailed employment sectors. See the note at the end for specifics.

While Oregon’s overall employment just returned to pre-Great Recession levels a couple months ago, a few of our clusters have outperformed and done considerably better. One in particular is the state’s alcohol cluster — the group of breweries, wineries, distilleries and their distributors and retail outlets. Since the start of 2008, these jobs in Oregon have increased 46 percent (!), or about 5,200 jobs. This is also an undercount of growth as some breweries (or brewpubs) are classified as restaurants and pulling their information is difficult, although the Employment Department does an annual beer report.

AlcoholCluster2014

Fun Fact: In general, when looking at Oregon as a share of the U.S. we are usually 1.2 to 1.4 percent of the total — be it population, jobs, exports, etc. However in terms of the alcohol cluster, Oregon is 2 percent of the U.S. which is quite large relative to all of our other rankings. In terms of a location quotient, Oregon’s alcohol industry is a 1.6 (2014 data), indicating Oregon’s alcohol cluster is 60 percent larger relative to the typical state, after adjusting for size.

Alcohol Cluster definition: Breweries (NAICS 31212), Wineries (NAICS 31213), Distilleries (NAICS 31214), Beer, Wine, Distilled Alcohol Beverage Merchant Wholesalers (NAICS 4248), Beer, Wine and Liquor Stores (NAICS 44531), Drinking Places, Alcoholic Beverages (NAICS 7224)


Responses

  1. […] new data, recently revealed by Oregon’s Office of Economic Analysis, highlights that, since the start of 2008, new jobs falling into this cluster have increased 46 […]

  2. […] new data, recently revealed by Oregon’s Office of Economic Analysis, highlights that, since the start of 2008, new jobs falling into this cluster have increased 46 […]

  3. […] new data, recently revealed by Oregon’s Office of Economic Analysis, highlights that, since the start of 2008, new jobs falling into this cluster have increased 46 […]

  4. […] because there are three times as many breweries today than a decade ago — the industry, and broader alcohol cluster, is doing quite well here in Oregon. To the extent that Oregon is and will continue to develop a […]

  5. […] matters because our growing alcohol cluster is increasingly a traded sector industry. As the Oregon market becomes more saturated with great […]

  6. […] Recreational marijuana is still an infant industry. We do not have a lot of good data yet. Previously we looked at the border impact with Washington. However as Mark talked about we really care about the broader impact of ancillary industries and the high value-added products and services. A good example is the alcohol cluster here in Oregon. See page 4 of our beer report for a more complete summary. And here is a chart comparing employment growth for the the overall alcohol cluster in Oregon and the U.S. […]


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