Posted by: Josh Lehner | June 6, 2014

U.S. Jobs Are Back … To Pre-Recession Levels

With the May jobs report, the U.S. economy is now back to pre-recession peak levels of employment. While this is the longest post WWII recovery the U.S. has experienced — by a good margin — it is important to keep in mind that financial crises are different. When comparing the Great Recession against other advanced economies’ financial crises in recent decades, the current U.S. cycle has outperformed in terms of employment, even as most other measures of financial crises were just as bad — home prices, stock prices, GDP per capita, government debt and the like.

FinanacialCrises0514

 


Responses

  1. Superb graph, Josh.

  2. […] Josh Lehner today: U.S. Jobs Are Back … To Pre-Recession Levels With the May jobs report, the U.S. economy is now back to pre-recession peak levels of employment. […]

  3. […] But other countries have faced far grimmer conditions, as a new graphic from Oregon’s Economic Analysis office shows. […]

  4. […] But other countries have faced far grimmer conditions, as a new graphic from Oregon’s Economic Analysis office shows. […]

  5. […] Chosen excerpts by Job Market Monitor. Read the whole story at  U.S. Jobs Are Back … To Pre-Recession Levels | Oregon Office of Economic Analysis. […]

  6. […] la recuperación actual con otras crisis financieras importantes. El gráfico de abajo, desde Josh Lehner, espectáculos que desde esta perspectiva los EE.UU. recuperar realidad no se ve tan […]

  7. […] We can also compare the current recovery to other major financial crises. The graph below, from Josh Lehner, shows that in this light the U.S. recover actually doesn €™t look so […]

  8. […] Wiederaufnahme mit anderen bedeutenden Finanzkrisen auch vergleichen. Das Diagramm unten, von Josh Lehner, zeigt, dass so gesehen die US wirklich schlechten doesn € ™ t Blick so […]

  9. […] We can also compare the current recovery to other major financial crises. The graph below, from Josh Lehner, shows that in this light the U.S. recover actually doesn’t look so […]

  10. […] We can also compare the current recovery to other major financial crises. The graph below, from Josh Lehner, shows that in this light the U.S. recover actually doesn’t look so […]

  11. […] terms of post-financial crisis recoveries the US is doing pretty well.  (Oregon Economic Analysis via Calculated […]

  12. […] http://oregoneconomicanalysis.com/2014/06/06/u-s-jobs-are-back-to-pre-recession-levels/ […]

  13. […] The U.S. outperforms other nations in recoveries from financial crisis-induced recessions. Oregon Office of Economic Analysis. […]

  14. […] The U.S. outperforms other nations in recoveries from financial crisis-induced recessions. Oregon Office of Economic Analysis. […]

  15. […] Post Credit Crisis Job Creation Source: Oregon Office of Economic Analysis […]

  16. […] by a wide margin, this is relative to recessions. The second chart that we have today looks at the employment recovery in comparison to to previous financial crisis. What is interesting here is that this was the […]

  17. […] HT: oregoneconomicanalysis.com […]

  18. […] http://oregoneconomicanalysis.com/2014/06/06/u-s-jobs-are-back-to-pre-recession-levels/ […]

  19. […] http://oregoneconomicanalysis.com/2014/06/06/u-s-jobs-are-back-to-pre-recession-levels/ […]

  20. It would be great to include in this analysis how long the long-term unemployed were compensated. Sure the US is back now . . . after we finally ended 99 Weeks’ Unemployment Compensation. I believe the Nordic Countries exhibited a similar increase in employment (shown on your chart) AFTER reducing Long-Term Unemployment Compensation. I’m jut not sure about Spain and Japan, though (Japan may just have been an aging population).


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